Save the world – switch to Crunch!

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Accounting advice, Blog

Switch to CrunchCrunch sets itself apart from traditional accountancy firms in a number of ways. We have award-winning customer service, don’t bill by the hour, and are kind of a fun bunch to boot. Another difference is the amount of paperwork we generate – barely any. In fact the majority of the paper found in our office is in the form of those pesky manilla envelopes from HMRC.

Whereas accountancy has historically been the realm of ledgers, spreadsheets and lengthy correspondence, thanks to our bespoke software you can avoid all that dull, wasteful paperwork – everything is stored online and submitted to HMRC and Companies House electronically. But how much paperwork have we saved, exactly?

Well, allow us to elucidate -

Total invoices not printed through Crunch – 25,167

Total submissions to HMRC / Companies House (VAT submissions, Corporation Tax etc.) sent electronically – 7,007 (encompassing 15,185 pages)

Total pages digitised through our Past Accounts service – 25,660

Total paper correspondence not sent to clients – 4,532 (encompassing 15,682 pages)

All of this means that in the two short years we’ve been in operation we’ve saved a grand total of 81,694 pages, or around 112 pages per day!

So do the world a favour – switch to Crunch!

Photo by Ian BrittonCC

  • http://www.crunch.co.uk Darren Fell

    Absolutely brilliant!! So we *really* are green as a business and help others be green to boot! Great stats lifted from the Crunch system.

  • Graham

    ’81,694 pages, or around 112 sheets of A4 per day saved. If you laid all that paper end-to-end it would stretch from London to Moscow!’

    I hope the calculations used to add up my account are better than those used to add up that statistic.

    Or is there another Moscow located somewhere inside the M25? I guess ‘London to Somewhere Very Close To London’ doesn’t sound quite as impressive.
    :-)

    • Jon Norris

      Having reviewed my calculations, you appear to be correct!

      The lesson here is never let writers do maths :)